Issues

    Posts Tagged ‘mandatory arbitration’

  • Want a shot of arbitration with that latte? Just use your Starbucks Card! Friday, February 26, 2016 � by jg

    If Starbucks harms you at one of its stores, whether you can take them to court – and whether you can be fully compensated for your injuries – depends entirely on how you paid for your coffee.

  • Study finds social media users are being stripped of legal rights Wednesday, April 23, 2014 � by jg

    Users of social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram and Match.com are often — and often unknowingly — agreeing to give up their basic legal rights, according to two Boston professors who have studied the issue.

  • Report details demise of class actions Tuesday, May 7, 2013 � by jg

    Center for Justice & Democracy: A new white paper details “the slow demise of class actions in America.”

  • Jamie Leigh Jones gang rape accusation finally goes to court after escaping mandatory arbitration Tuesday, June 14, 2011 � by jg

    Houston Chronicle: Jury selection is underway in the case of a woman who says she was drugged and gang raped by coworkers six years ago while working for a contractor in Iraq, after she fought her employer’s efforts to force the case to binding arbitration.

  • What’s at stake in the dispute over class action lawsuits Monday, November 8, 2010 � by jg

    San Francisco Chronicle: Vanderbilt Law School professor Brian Fitzpatrick writes, “If people don’t sue, businesses know they can cheat people out of small amounts with impunity. Class actions band individuals together so businesses cannot escape accountability.”

  • Arbitration clause doesn’t let Hooters off the hook Thursday, August 26, 2010 � by jg

    Detroit Free Press: A Michigan judge has ruled a mandatory arbitration clause in Hooters employment contracts does not prevent the company from being sued for discriminating against waitresses based on weight.

  • “Beware the arbitration clause” Monday, June 28, 2010 � by jg

    New York Times editorial: “Businesses love these provisions, because arbitrators act quickly and almost always rule in their favor.”